Entries by 'Bill Pollak'

Reflections in Software Architecture: Presentations by Jeromy Carriere & Ian Gorton

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By Bill Pollak
Transition Manager
Research Technology & System Solutions

Bill Pollak It’s undeniable that the field of software architecture has grown during the past 20 years. In 2010, CNN/Money magazine identified "software architect" as the most desirable job in the U.S. Since 2004, the SEI has trained people from more than 900 organizations in the principles and practices of software architecture, and more than 1,800 people have earned the SEI Software Architecture Professional certificate. It is widely recognized today that architecture serves as the blueprint for both the system and the project developing it, defining the work assignments that must be performed by design and implementation teams. Architecture is the primary purveyor of system quality attributes, which are hard to achieve without a unifying architecture; it’s also the conceptual glue that holds every phase of projects together for their many stakeholders. This blog posting—the final installment in a series—provides lightly edited transcriptions of presentations by Jeromy Carriere and Ian Gorton at a SATURN 2012 roundtable, “Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture.”

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Reflection on 20 Years of Software Architecture: A Presentation by Robert Schwanke

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By Bill Pollak
Transition Manager
Research, Technology, & System Solutions

Bill PollakIt is widely recognized today that software architecture serves as the blueprint for both the system and the project developing it, defining the work assignments that must be performed by design and implementation teams. Architecture is the primary purveyor of system quality attributes that are hard to achieve without a unifying architecture; it’s also the conceptual glue that holds every phase of projects together for their many stakeholders. Last month, we presented two posting in a series from a panel at SATURN 2012 titled “Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture” that discussed the increased awareness of architecture as a primary means for achieving desired quality attributes and advances in software architecture practice for distributed real-time embedded systems during the past two decades. This blog posting—the next in the series—provides a lightly edited transcription of a presentation by Robert Schwanke, who reflected on four general problems in software architecture: modularity, systems of systems, maintainable architecture descriptions, and system architecture.

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Reflections on 20 Years of Architecture: A Presentation by Douglas C. Schmidt

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By Bill Pollak
Transition Manager
Research Technology & System Solutions

Bill PollakLast week, we presented the first posting in a series from a panel at SATURN 2012 titled "Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture." In her remarks on the panel summarizing the evolution of software architecture work at the SEI, Linda Northrop, director of the SEI's Research, Technology, and System Solutions (RTSS) Program, referred to the steady growth in system scale and complexity over the past two decades and the increased awareness of architecture as a primary means for achieving desired quality attributes, such as performance, reliability, evolvability, and security.

It’s undeniable that the field of software architecture has grown during the past 20 years. In 2010, CNN/Money Magazine identified "software architect" as the most desirable job in the U.S. Since 2004, the SEI has trained people from more than 900 organizations in the principles and practices of software architecture, and more than 1,800 people have earned the SEI Software Architecture Professional certificate. It is widely recognized today that architecture serves as the blueprint for both the system and the project developing it, defining the work assignments that must be performed by design and implementation teams. Architecture is the primary purveyor of system quality attributes which are hard to achieve without a unifying architecture; it’s also the conceptual glue that holds every phase of projects together for their many stakeholders.

This blog posting—the second in a series—provides a lightly edited transcription of a presentation by Douglas C. Schmidt, former chief technology officer of the SEI and currently a professor of computer science at Vanderbilt University, who discussed advances in software architecture practice for distributed real-time embedded systems during the past two decades.

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Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture: A Presentation by Linda Northrop

Architecture , Architecture Documentation , Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM) , Quality Attribute Workshop , Reflections on Software Architecture , Ultra Large Scale Systems 4 Comments »

By Bill Pollak,
Transition Manager
Research, Technology, & System Solutions

Bill PollakA search on the term "software architecture" on the web as it existed in 1992 yielded 88,700 results. In May, during a panel providing a 20-year retrospective on software architecture hosted at the SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) conference, moderator Rick Kazman noted that on the day of the panel discussion—May 9, 2012— that same search yielded 2,380,000 results. This 30-fold increase stems from various factors, including the steady growth in system complexity, the increased awareness of the importance of software architecture on system quality attributes, and the quality and impact of efforts by the SEI and other groups conducting research and transition activities on software architecture. This blog posting—the first in a series—provides a lightly edited transcription of the presentation of the first panelist, Linda Northrop, director of the SEI’s Research, Technology, & System Solutions (RTSS) Program at the SEI, who provided an overview of the evolution of software architecture work at the SEI during the past twenty years.

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