Entries Tagged as 'Acquisition '

A Deeper Dive into the Method Framework for Engineering System Architectures

Acquisition No Comments »

By Don Firesmith
Senior Member of the Technical Staff
Acquisition Support Program

Don Firesmith Engineering the architecture for a large and complex system is a hard, lengthy, and complex undertaking. System architects must perform many tasks and use many techniques if they are to create a sufficient set of architectural models and related documents that are complete, consistent, correct, unambiguous, verifiable, usable, and useful to the architecture’s many stakeholders.  This blog posting, the second in a two-part series, takes a deeper dive into the Method Framework for Engineering System Architectures (MFESA), which is a situational process engineering framework for developing system-specific methods to engineer system architectures.

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The Latest Research from the SEI

Acquisition , CERT No Comments »

By Douglas C. Schmidt
Principal Researcher

Douglas C. SchmidtAs part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I'd like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in workforce competency and readiness, cyber forensics, exploratory research, acquisition, and software-reliant systems. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website.

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Reducing Project Failures by Aligning Acquisition Strategy and Software Architecture with Stakeholder Needs

Acquisition , Architecture No Comments »

Second in a Two-Part Series
By Lisa Brownsword
Acquisition Support Program

Lisa BrownswordMajor acquisition programs increasingly rely on software to provide substantial portions of system capabilities. All too often, however, software is not considered when the early, most constraining program decisions are made.  SEI researchers have identified misalignments between software architecture and system acquisition strategies that lead to program restarts, cancellations, and failures to meet important missions or business goals. This blog posting—the second installment in a two-part series—builds on the discussions in part one by introducing several patterns of misalignment—known as anti-patterns—that we’ve identified in our research and discussing how these anti-patterns are helping us create a new method for aligning software architecture and system acquisition strategies to reduce project failure.

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The Method Framework for Engineering System Architectures

Acquisition 4 Comments »

By Don Firesmith
Researcher
Acquisition Support Program

Don Firesmith Engineering the architecture for a large and complex system is a hard, lengthy, and complex undertaking. System architects must perform many tasks and use many techniques if they are to create a sufficient set of architectural models and related documents that are complete, consistent, correct, unambiguous, verifiable, and both usable by and useful to the architecture’s many stakeholders.  This blog posting, the first in a two-part series, presents the Method Framework for Engineering System Architectures (MFESA), which is a situational process engineering framework for developing system-specific methods to engineer system architectures. This posting provides a brief historical description of situational method engineering, explains why no single system architectural engineering method is adequate, and introduces MFESA by providing a top-level overview of its components, describing its applicability, and explaining how it simultaneously provides the benefits of standardization and flexibility.  

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Reducing Project Failures by Aligning Acquisition Strategy and Software Architecture with Stakeholder Needs

Acquisition , Architecture 5 Comments »

First in a Two-Part Series
By Lisa Brownsword
Acquisition Support Program

Lisa BrownswordMajor acquisition programs increasingly rely on software to provide substantial portions of system capabilities.  Not surprisingly, therefore, software issues are driving system cost and schedule overruns.  All too often, however, software is not even a consideration when the early, most constraining program decisions are made.  Through analysis of troubled programs, SEI researchers have identified misalignments between software architecture and system acquisition strategies that lead to program restarts, cancellations, and failures to meet important missions or business goals. To address these misalignments, the SEI is conducting new research on enabling organizations to reduce program failures by harmonizing their acquisition strategy with their software architecture.  This blog posting—the first in a two-part series—motivates the problem of misalignment and describes the SEI’s current research for addressing this problem by analyzing program-specific quality attributes associated with business and mission goals.

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