Entries Tagged as 'Agile '

Applying the 12 Agile Principles in the Department of Defense

Agile 1 Comment »

By Suzanne Miller
Principal Researcher
Software Solutions Division

Suzanne MillerIn 2010, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a 25-point plan to reform IT that called on federal agencies to employ “shorter delivery time frames, an approach consistent with Agile” when developing or acquiring IT. OMB data suggested Agile practices could help federal agencies and other organizations design and acquire software more effectively, but agencies needed to understand the risks involved in adopting these practices. Two years later, OMB directed agencies to consider Agile development in its 2012 contracting guidance. As organizations work to become more agile, they can employ the 12 principles outlined in the Agile Manifesto to assess progress. I work with a team of researchers at the SEI who explore the barriers and enablers to applying Agile in government settings. We have found that each of these principles plays out differently in the federal landscape. While some principles are a natural fit, others are harder to implement. This blog post introduces a series of discussions recorded as podcasts about the application (and challenges) of the 12 Agile principles across the Department of Defense (DoD).

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Is Your Organization Ready for Agile?

Agile , Readiness & Fit Analysis 3 Comments »

By Suzanne Miller
Principal Researcher
Software Solutions Division

This blog post is the sixth in a series on Agile adoption in regulated settings, such as the Department of Defense, Internal Revenue Service, and Food and Drug Administration.

Suzanne Miller "Across the government, we’ve decreased the time it takes across our high-impact investments to deliver functionality by 20 days over the past year alone. That is a big indicator that agencies across the board are adopting agile or agile-like practices," Lisa Schlosser, acting federal chief information officer, said in a November 2014 interview with Federal News Radio. Schlosser based her remarks on data collected by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) over the last year. In 2010, the OMB issued guidance calling on federal agencies to employ “shorter delivery time frames, an approach consistent with Agile” when developing or acquiring IT. As evidenced by the OMB data, Agile practices can help federal agencies and other organizations design and acquire software more effectively, but they need to understand the risks involved when contemplating the use of Agile. This ongoing series on Readiness & Fit Analysis (RFA) focuses on helping federal agencies and other organizations in regulated settings understand the risks involved when contemplating or embarking on a new approach to developing or acquiring software. Specifically, this blog post, the sixth in a series, explores issues related to system attributes organizations should consider when adopting Agile.

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The 2014 Year in Review: Top 10 Blog Posts

Agile , Android , Big Data , DevOps , Malware , Secure Coding No Comments »

By Douglas C. Schmidt 
Principal Researcher

Douglas C. Schmidt In 2014, the SEI blog has experienced unprecedented growth, with visitors in record numbers learning more about our work in big datasecure coding for Androidmalware analysisHeartbleed, and V Models for Testing. In 2014 (through December 21), the SEI blog logged 129,000 visits, nearly double the entire 2013 yearly total of 66,757 visits. As we look back on the last 12 months, this blog posting highlights our 10 most popular blog posts (based on the number of visits). As we did with our mid-year review, we will include links to additional related resources that readers might find of interest. We also grouped posts by research area to make it easier for readers to learn about related areas of work. 

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Agile Metrics: Seven Categories

Acquisition , Agile No Comments »

By Will Hayes 
Senior Member of the Technical Staff
Software Solutions Division 

Will HayesMore and more, suppliers of software-reliant Department of Defense (DoD) systems are moving away from traditional waterfall development practices in favor of agile methods. As described in previous posts on this blog, agile methods are effective for shortening delivery cycles and managing costs. If the benefits of agile are to be realized effectively for the DoD, however, personnel responsible for overseeing software acquisitions must be fluent in metrics used to monitor these programs. This blog post highlights the results of an effort by researchers at the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute to create a reference for personnel who oversee software development acquisition for major systems built by developers applying agile methods. This post also presents seven categories for tracking agile metrics.

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Evolutionary Improvements of Quality Attributes: Performance in Practice

Agile , Architecture , Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM) , Quality Attribute Workshop No Comments »

By Neil Ernst 
Member of the Technical Staff 
Software Solutions Division

This post is co-authored by Stephany Bellomo

Neil ErnstContinuous delivery practices, popularized in Jez Humble’s 2010 bookContinuous Delivery, enable rapid and reliable software system deployment by emphasizing the need for automated testing and building, as well as closer cooperation between developers and delivery teams. As part of the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) focus on Agile software development, we have been researching ways to incorporate quality attributes into the short iterations common to Agile development. We know from existing SEI work on Attribute-Driven DesignQuality Attribute Workshops, and the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method that a focus on quality attributes prevents costly rework. Such a long-term perspective, however, can be hard to maintain in a high-tempo, Agile delivery model, which is why the SEI continues to recommend an architecture-centric engineering approach, regardless of the software methodology chosen. As part of our work in value-driven incremental delivery, we conducted exploratory interviews with teams in these high-tempo environments to characterize how they managed architectural quality attribute requirements (QARs). These requirements—such as performance, security, and availability—have a profound impact on system architecture and design, yet are often hard to divide, or slice, into the iteration-sized user stories common to iterative and incremental development. This difficulty typically exists because some attributes, such as performance, touch multiple parts of the system. This blog post summarizes the results of our research on slicing (refining) performance in two production software systems. We also examined the ratcheting (periodic increase of a specific response measure) of scenario components to allocate QAR work.

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