Entries Tagged as 'Architecture '

Evolutionary Improvements of Quality Attributes: Performance in Practice

Agile , Architecture , Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method (ATAM) , Quality Attribute Workshop No Comments »

By Neil Ernst 
Member of the Technical Staff 
Software Solutions Division

This post is co-authored by Stephany Bellomo

Neil ErnstContinuous delivery practices, popularized in Jez Humble’s 2010 bookContinuous Delivery, enable rapid and reliable software system deployment by emphasizing the need for automated testing and building, as well as closer cooperation between developers and delivery teams. As part of the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) focus on Agile software development, we have been researching ways to incorporate quality attributes into the short iterations common to Agile development. We know from existing SEI work on Attribute-Driven DesignQuality Attribute Workshops, and the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method that a focus on quality attributes prevents costly rework. Such a long-term perspective, however, can be hard to maintain in a high-tempo, Agile delivery model, which is why the SEI continues to recommend an architecture-centric engineering approach, regardless of the software methodology chosen. As part of our work in value-driven incremental delivery, we conducted exploratory interviews with teams in these high-tempo environments to characterize how they managed architectural quality attribute requirements (QARs). These requirements—such as performance, security, and availability—have a profound impact on system architecture and design, yet are often hard to divide, or slice, into the iteration-sized user stories common to iterative and incremental development. This difficulty typically exists because some attributes, such as performance, touch multiple parts of the system. This blog post summarizes the results of our research on slicing (refining) performance in two production software systems. We also examined the ratcheting (periodic increase of a specific response measure) of scenario components to allocate QAR work.

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Using Quality Attributes as a Means to Improve Acquisition Strategies

Acquisition , Architecture No Comments »

By Lisa Brownsword,
Senior Members of the Technical Staff

Lisa BrownswordAlthough software is increasingly important to the success of government programs, there is often little consideration given to its impact on early key program decisions. The Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute (SEI) is conducting a multi-phase research initiative aimed at answering the question: is the probability of a program’s success improved through deliberately producing a program acquisition strategy and software architecture that are mutually constrained and aligned? Moreover, can we develop a method that helps government program offices produce such alignment? This blog post, the third in a series on this multi-year research, describes our approach to determining how acquisition quality attributes can be expressed and used to facilitate alignment among the software architecture and acquisition strategy.

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The Latest Research from the SEI

Architecture , Cloud Computing , Insider Threat , System of Systems , Team Software Process (TSP) No Comments »

By Douglas C. Schmidt
Principal Researcher

Douglas C. SchmidtAs part of an ongoing effort to keep you informed about our latest work, I would like to let you know about some recently published SEI technical reports and notes. These reports highlight the latest work of SEI technologists in systems of systems integration from an architectural perspective, unintentional insider threat that derives from social engineering, identifying physical security gaps in international mail processing centers and similar facilities, countermeasures used by cloud service providers, the Team Software Process (TSP), and key automation and analysis techniques. This post includes a listing of each report, author(s), and links where the published reports can be accessed on the SEI website. 

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Security Pattern Assurance through Round-trip Engineering

Architecture No Comments »

By Rick Kazman
Senior Member of the Technical Staff
Software Solutions Division

Rick KazmanThe process of designing and analyzing software architectures is complex. Architectural design is a minimally constrained search through a vast multi-dimensional space of possibilities. The end result is that architects are seldom confident that they have done the job optimally, or even satisfactorily. Over the past two decades, practitioners and researchers have used architectural patterns to expedite sound software design. Architectural patterns are prepackaged chunks of design that provide proven structural solutions for achieving particular software system quality attributes, such as scalability or modifiability. While use of patterns has simplified the architectural design process somewhat, key challenges remain. This blog explores these challenges and our solutions for achieving system security qualities through use of patterns.

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Agile and Architecture Practices for Rapid Delivery

Agile , Architecture 1 Comment »

Examples From Real-World Projects
By Stephany Bellomo
Senior Member of the Technical Staff
Software Solutions Division

Stephany BellomoAgile projects with incremental development lifecycles are showing greater promise in enabling organizations to rapidly field software compared to waterfall projects. There is a lack of clarity, however, regarding the factors that constitute and contribute to success of Agile projects. A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute, including Ipek Ozkaya, Robert Nord, and myself, interviewed project teams with incremental development lifecycles from five government and commercial organizations. This blog posting summarizes the findings from this study to understand key success and failure factors for rapid fielding on their projects.

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