Entries Tagged as 'Common Operating Platform Environments (COPEs) '

The Importance of Automated Testing in Open Systems Architecture Initiatives

Architecture , Automated Testing , Common Operating Platform Environments (COPEs) , Open Systems Architectures No Comments »

To view a video of this blog post in its entirety, please click here.

By Douglas C. Schmidt
Principal Researcher

Douglas C. Schmidt To view a video of the introduction, please click here.

The Better Buying Power 2.0 initiative is a concerted effort by the United States Department of Defense to achieve greater efficiencies in the development, sustainment, and recompetition of major defense acquisition programs through cost control, elimination of unproductive processes and bureaucracy, and promotion of open competition. This SEI blog posting describes how the Navy is operationalizing Better Buying Power in the context of their Open Systems Architecture and Business Innovation initiatives.  This posting also presents the results from a recent online war game that underscore the importance of automated testing in these initiatives to help avoid common traps and pitfalls of earlier cost containment measures.

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The Architectural Evolution of DoD Combat Systems

Architecture , Common Operating Platform Environments (COPEs) No Comments »

By Douglas C. Schmidt
Principal Researcher

Douglas C. Schmidt To deliver enhanced integrated warfighting capability at lower cost across the enterprise and over the lifecycle, the Department of Defense (DoD) must move away from stove-piped solutions and towards a limited number of technical reference frameworks based on reusable hardware and software components and services. There have been previous efforts in this direction, but in an era of sequestration and austerity, the DoD has reinvigorated its efforts to identify effective methods of creating more affordable acquisition choices and reducing the cycle time for initial acquisition and new technology insertion.  This blog posting is part of an ongoing series on how acquisition professionals and system integrators can apply Open Systems Architecture (OSA) practices to decompose large monolithic business and technical designs into manageable, capability-oriented frameworks that can integrate innovation more rapidly and lower total ownership costs. The focus of this posting is on the evolution of DoD combat systems from ad hoc stovepipes to more modular and layered architectures.

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Towards Affordable DoD Combat Systems in the Age of Sequestration

Architecture , Common Operating Platform Environments (COPEs) No Comments »

By Douglas C. Schmidt
Principal Researcher

Douglas C. Department of Defense (DoD) program managers and associated acquisition professionals are increasingly called upon to steward the development of complex, software-reliant combat systems. In today’s environment of expanded threats and constrained resources (e.g., sequestration), their focus is on minimizing the cost and schedule of combat-system acquisition, while simultaneously ensuring interoperability and innovation. A promising approach for meeting these challenging goals is Open Systems Architecture (OSA), which combines (1) technical practices designed to reduce the cycle time needed to acquire new systems and insert new technology into legacy systems and (2) business models for creating a more competitive marketplace and a more effective strategy for managing intellectual property rights in DoD acquisition programs. This blog posting expands upon our earlier coverage of how acquisition professionals and system integrators can apply OSA practices to decompose large monolithic business and technical designs into manageable, capability-oriented frameworks that can integrate innovation more rapidly and lower total ownership costs.

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Applying Agility to Common Operating Platform Environment Initiatives

Agile , Common Operating Platform Environments (COPEs) No Comments »

By Douglas C. Schmidt,
Principal Researcher

Douglas C. SchmidtWhile agile methods have become popular in commercial software development organizations, the engineering disciplines needed to apply agility to mission-critical, software-reliant systems are not as well defined or practiced. To help bridge this gap, the SEI recently hosted the Agile Research Forum. The event brought together researchers and practitioners from around the world to discuss when and how to best apply agile methods in mission-critical environments found in government and many industries. This blog posting, the fifth and final installment in a multi-part series highlighting research presented during the forum, summarizes a presentation I gave on the importance of applying agile methods to common operating platform environments (COPEs) that have become increasingly important for the Department of Defense (DoD).

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Software Producibility for Defense

Acquisition , Architecture , Common Operating Platform Environments (COPEs) , Software Sustainment , System of Systems , Ultra Large Scale Systems No Comments »

By Bill Scherlis,
Chief Technology Officer (Acting)
SEI

Bill Scherlis The extent of software in Department of Defense (DoD) systems has increased by more than an order of magnitude every decade. This is not just because there are more systems with more software; a similar growth pattern has been exhibited within individual, long-lived military systems.  In recognition of this growing software role, the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E, now ASD(R&E)) requested the National Research Council (NRC) to undertake a study of defense software producibility, with the purpose of identifying the principal challenges and developing recommendations regarding both improvement to practice and priorities for research. The NRC appointed a committee, which I chaired, that included many individuals well known to the SEI community, including Larry Druffel, Doug Schmidt, Robert Behler, Barry Boehm, and others. After more than three years of effort—which included an intensive review and revision process—we issued our final report, Critical Code: Software Producibility for Defense. In the year and a half since the report was published, I have been asked to brief it extensively to the DoD and the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) communities.

This blog posting, the first in a series, highlights several of the committee’s key findings, specifically focusing on three areas of identified improvements to practice—areas where the committee judged that improvements both are feasible and could substantially help the DoD to acquire, sustain, and assure software-reliant systems of all kinds.

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