Entries Tagged as 'Team Software Process (TSP)'

Addressing the Challenges of Agile with TSP: A Case Study

Agile , Team Software Process (TSP) 3 Comments »

By Bill Nichols,
Senior Member of the Technical Staff
Software Engineering Process Management

Bill NicholsThis post is the third and final installment in a three-part series that explains how Nedbank, one of the largest banks in South Africa, is rolling out the SEI’s Team Software Process (TSP) throughout its IT organization. In the first post of this series, I examined how Nedbank addressed issues of quality and productivity among its software engineering teams using TSP at the individual and team level. In the second post, I discussed how the SEI worked with Nedbank to address challenges with expanding and scaling the use of TSP at an organizational level. In this post, I first explore challenges common to many organizations seeking to improve performance and become more agile and conclude by demonstrating how SEI researchers addressed these challenges in the TSP rollout at Nedbank.

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Rolling Out TSP Organizational Performance Improvement: A Case Study

Team Software Process (TSP) No Comments »

Second Installment in a Three-Part Series
By Bill Nichols,
Senior Member of the Technical Staff
Software Engineering Process Management

Bill NicholsThis post is the second installment in a three-part series that explains how Nedbank, one of the largest banks in South Africa, is rolling out the SEI’s Team Software Process (TSP)—a disciplined and agile software process improvement method—throughout its IT organization.  In the first post of this series, I examined how Nedbank addressed issues of quality and productivity among its software engineering teams using TSP at the individual and team level. In this post, I will discuss how the SEI worked with Nedbank to address challenges with expanding and scaling the use of TSP at an organizational level.

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Balancing Agility and Discipline at Scale

Agile , Team Software Process (TSP) 7 Comments »

Douglas C. SchmidtBy Douglas C. Schmidt
Principal Researcher

While agile methods have become popular in commercial software development organizations, the engineering disciplines needed to apply agility to mission-critical, software-reliant systems are not as well defined or practiced. To help bridge this gap, the SEI recently hosted the Agile Research Forum. The event brought together researchers and practitioners from around the world to discuss when and how to best apply agile methods in mission-critical environments found in government and many industries. This blog posting, the fourth installment in a multi-part series highlighting research presented during the forum, summarizes a talk by James Over, manager of the Team Software Process (TSP) initiative, who advocated the building of self-managed teams, planning and measuring project process, designing before building, and making quality the top priority, among other principles associated with applying agile methods at-scale.

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Improving Software Team Performance with TSP

Team Software Process (TSP) 2 Comments »

By Bill Nichols,
Senior Member of the Technical Staff
Software Engineering Process Management

Bill Nichols In his book Drive, Daniel Pink writes that knowledge workers want autonomy, purpose, and mastery in their work. A big problem with any change in processes is getting the people who do the work to change how they work. Too often, people are told what to do instead of being given the information, autonomy, and authority to analyze and adopt the new methods for themselves.  This posting—the first in a two-part series—describes a case study that shows how Team Software Process (TSP) principles allowed developers at a large bank to address challenges, improve their productivity, and thrive in an agile environment.

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Toward Efficient and Effective Software Sustainment, Second in a Series

Acquisition , CMMI , Software Sustainment , Team Software Process (TSP) No Comments »

By Mike Phillips
Principal Researcher
Acquisition Support Program

 Mike Phillips In my preceding blog post, I promised to provide more examples highlighting the importance of software sustainment in the US Department of Defense (DoD). My focus is on certain configurations of weapons systems that are no longer in production for the United States Air Force, but are expected to remain a key component of our defense capability for decades to come, and thus software upgrade cycles need to refresh capabilities every 18 to 24 months. Throughout this series on efficient and effective software sustainment, I will highlight examples from each branch of the military. This second blog post describes effective sustainment engineering efforts in the Air Force, using examples from across the service’s Air Logistics Centers (ALCs).

 

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